Apr 30,  · The Origin of the Phrase “As Dead as a Doornail” Faith without works is feebler than nothing, and dead as a doornail. As you can see, contrary to popular belief, William Shakespeare did not coin the phrase. It was around long before Shakespeare was writing his plays and sonnets. The bard did, however, have a hand in making the phrase. Dec 12,  · Best Answer: As has been noted, the ORIGINAL expression is "dead as a doornail". I'm not surprised that a variation like "deader than a doorknob" would appear either because most people don't even know what exactly what a "doornail" is! and so, not surprisingly, they don't know what the original expression Status: Open. Sep 30,  · I found the mouse who lived in our wall, lying on his back with his feet in the air—as dead as a doorknob. Usage notes. Many other nouns can be substituted for "doorknob", perhaps the oldest being "doornail" used by William Shakespeare, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 4, scene 10; and also by Charles Dickens in A Christmas Carol.

Deader than a doorknob origin

deader than a doornail down into the wood. A nail that was bent in this fashion (and thus not easily pulled out) was said to be "dead", thus dead as a doornail. As to why it is then a “doornail” instead of other cases where such clenching was done, it's thought it was probably simply because this was. Dead as a doornail is a phrase which means not alive, An alternative wording of the phrase dead as a doornail is deader than a doornail. The phrase is deader than a doornail (or dead as a doornail). . The Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins, quote a correspondent who. But why particularly a doornail, rather than just any old nail? Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins, quote a correspondent who points. I tried the flashlight, but the battery was as dead as a doorknob. I found the mouse who lived in our wall, lying on his back with his feet in the air—as dead as a. deader than a doornail down into the wood. A nail that was bent in this fashion (and thus not easily pulled out) was said to be "dead", thus dead as a doornail. As to why it is then a “doornail” instead of other cases where such clenching was done, it's thought it was probably simply because this was. Dead as a doornail is a phrase which means not alive, An alternative wording of the phrase dead as a doornail is deader than a doornail. A door knob is not alive and never has been--you can't get any more dead. (My mother used to say, "dead as a door nail." I have no idea what a. Apr 30,  · The Origin of the Phrase “As Dead as a Doornail” Faith without works is feebler than nothing, and dead as a doornail. As you can see, contrary to popular belief, William Shakespeare did not coin the phrase. It was around long before Shakespeare was writing his plays and sonnets. The bard did, however, have a hand in making the phrase. Sep 30,  · I found the mouse who lived in our wall, lying on his back with his feet in the air—as dead as a doorknob. Usage notes. Many other nouns can be substituted for "doorknob", perhaps the oldest being "doornail" used by William Shakespeare, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 4, scene 10; and also by Charles Dickens in A Christmas Carol. Nov 16,  · (simile) Unquestionably dead. Used for both inanimate objects and once living beings. I picked up the phone, but the line was dead as a doornail. We finally found John's cat run over in the next road. It was as dead as a doornail. , Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, stave 1, Old Marley was as dead as a. Langland also used the expression in the much more famous poem The Vision of William Concerning Piers Plowman, circa Fey withouten fait is febelore þen nouȝt, And ded as a dore-nayl. [Faith without works is feebler than nothing, and dead as a garudabulletin.com expression was in widespread colloquial use in England by the 16th century, when Shakespeare gave these lines to the rebel leader. What does "deader than a doornail" mean? I've read the word plenty of times but don't know the meaning to it. Stack Exchange Network. Stack Exchange network consists of Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, The phrase is deader than a doornail This site speculates on its origin. Dec 12,  · Best Answer: As has been noted, the ORIGINAL expression is "dead as a doornail". I'm not surprised that a variation like "deader than a doorknob" would appear either because most people don't even know what exactly what a "doornail" is! and so, not surprisingly, they don't know what the original expression Status: Open. A doornail was one of the large iron studs formerly often used on doors for ornamentation or for added strength; the word occurred in various alliterative phrases (e.g. deaf as a doornail and dour as a doornail) but dead as a doornail is now the only one in common use. The English language is forever changing. New words appear; old ones fall out of use or alter their meanings. World Wide Words tries to record at least a part of this shifting wordscape by featuring new words, word histories, words in the news, and the curiosities of native English speech.

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Tags: O hippie diamba music , , Midnight choir mercy of maria , , Pc mw3 mod menu . What does "deader than a doornail" mean? I've read the word plenty of times but don't know the meaning to it. Stack Exchange Network. Stack Exchange network consists of Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, The phrase is deader than a doornail This site speculates on its origin. Nov 16,  · (simile) Unquestionably dead. Used for both inanimate objects and once living beings. I picked up the phone, but the line was dead as a doornail. We finally found John's cat run over in the next road. It was as dead as a doornail. , Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, stave 1, Old Marley was as dead as a. Apr 30,  · The Origin of the Phrase “As Dead as a Doornail” Faith without works is feebler than nothing, and dead as a doornail. As you can see, contrary to popular belief, William Shakespeare did not coin the phrase. It was around long before Shakespeare was writing his plays and sonnets. The bard did, however, have a hand in making the phrase.

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